Remarketing:

Evidence-Based Intervention and the use of Punishment

Evidence-Based Intervention and the use of Punishment – A Workshop with Dr. Brian Iwata

WORKSHOP (4 CE Credits)

Dr. Brian Iwata, foremost researcher and practitioner in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis, speaks to the state of the field in research and practice. The “right to effective treatment” is a part of U.S. Civil Rights code, from the early 19th century speaks to an individual’s right to treatment that is effective and efficient. In the context of today’s politically charged environment, the question arises as to whether it is ever appropriate to use stimuli for behavior change that are considered aversive. The founding literature for the area of ABA referred to as Positive Behavior Supports (PBS), is very clear that PBS is not meant to address individuals with what is considered as ‘severe’ behavior. There are people for whom PBS is simply not an entire option. So how are behavior analysts to develop programs for the most severely behaviorally involved? Dr. Iwata is uniquely qualified to speak to the topic based on years of research and treatment of individuals with the most severe behaviors.Services for the UnderServed - Prevention of Severe Problem Behavior workshop

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The presentation is geared for clinicians and educators who want information regarding answers that drill down deeper than the veneer of Positive Behavior Supports. When, if ever is it appropriate to use more intrusive interventions to shape behavior? What are the best practice measures to assure that the least intrusive and most effective treatments are used? And, what does a clinical team do to make sure that an individual’s civil right to effective treatment is met?

Attendees will learn:

  • The evidence and current research for effective treatment
  • How to differentiate the use of Positive Behavior Supports (PBS) from cases requiring alternate stimuli
  • When and if use of aversive stimuli are required for effective treatment

This workshop qualifies for 4 Continuing Education Credits.

The natural science approach of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has come to inform many of the world’s most effective, person-centered clinical and educational practices. Dr. Brian Iwata, a preeminent figure in the field of ABA for over 30 years, has used this natural science approach to advance the assessment and treatment of challenging behavior. As a prolific researcher, clinician, and educator, Dr. Iwata serves as an advocate for the intellectually disabled (ID) community, and provides a rare sense of perspective for administrators, clinicians, and direct caregivers.

Who Should Attend:
This workshop will provide essential information for program administrators, behavior analysts (BCABAs & BCBAs), psychologists, Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs), special education staff, and supervisors. The procedures discussed during this session can be implemented across a variety of settings – such as group homes, schools, day programs, and employment sites. This session has been approved for continuing education hours for BCBAs and BCaBAs by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board.

ABOUT DR. BRIAN A. IWATA:
Dr. Iwata has influenced a broad range of issues central to the care and habilitation of individuals with ID. His work has covered severe self-injury and aggression, skill acquisition, caregiver performance, community preparation, and eating disorders. He has directed clinical research programs in each of these areas and has served as an expert evaluator at the individual level as well as consultant to the departments of health, mental health, and developmental disabilities in over 25 states. His approach to treatment based on these experiences integrates the perspectives of the clinician, researcher, administrator, and peer reviewer.

Dr. Iwata received his Ph.D. in Psychology from Florida State University and is currently Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Florida, Director of the Florida Center on Self-Injury, and Director of the UF-ARC Prader-Willi Syndrome Program. He previously held faculty appointment at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Western Michigan University. His primary areas of interest are applied behavior analysis, behavioral pediatrics, developmental disabilities, program evaluation, and staff management. He has published over 225 articles and chapters on these topics, and he has received over $6 million in research grants to support that work.

Dr. Iwata is the former Chief Editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Chair of the Human Development Study Section of the National Institutes of Health, President of the following societies: the Association for Behavior Analysis, the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, Division 33 of the American Psychological Association, the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and the Florida Association for Behavior Analysis. He is a Fellow in the American Psychological Association, the Association for Behavior Analysis, the Association for Psychological Science, and the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

How to Prevent Problem Behavior: A Workshop by Dr. Brian Iwata

DPrevention of Severe Problem Behaviors – A Workshop with Dr. Brian Iwatar. Brian Iwata presents: Preventing Problem Behavior

Dr. Iwata will speak on applied research regarding preventing problem behavior including recent developments in the field of ABA as they pertain to the topic. This half-day workshop will review modern methods for the assessment and treatment of challenging behavior, and discuss strategies of using ABA-based methods to move from intervention after problem behavior occurs towards prevention. As Dr. Iwata noted while visiting Services for the UnderServed:Services for the UnderServed - Prevention of Severe Problem Behavior workshop

“The field of ABA has done amazing work in responding to behavior after it occurs. I believe the evolution of our work in the coming decade will focus more on the antecedents to problem behavior, and what can be done to prevent its occurrence.

 

This workshop qualifies for 4.5 Continuing Education Credits.

Click here to register

The natural science approach of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has come to inform many of the world’s most effective, person-centered clinical and educational practices. Dr. Brian Iwata, a preeminent figure in the field of ABA for over 30 years, has used this natural science approach to advance the assessment and treatment of challenging behavior. As a prolific researcher, clinician, and educator, Dr. Iwata serves as an advocate for the intellectually disabled (ID) community, and provides a rare sense of perspective for administrators, clinicians, and direct caregivers.

Who Should Attend:
This workshop will provide essential information for program administrators, behavior analysts (BCABAs & BCBAs), psychologists, Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs), special education staff, and supervisors. The procedures discussed during this session can be implemented across a variety of settings – such as group homes, schools, day programs, and employment sites. This session has been approved for continuing education hours for BCBAs and BCaBAs by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board.

ABOUT DR. BRIAN A. IWATA:
Dr. Iwata has influenced a broad range of issues central to the care and habilitation of individuals with ID. His work has covered severe self-injury and aggression, skill acquisition, caregiver performance, community preparation, and eating disorders. He has directed clinical research programs in each of these areas and has served as an expert evaluator at the individual level as well as consultant to the departments of health, mental health, and developmental disabilities in over 25 states. His approach to treatment based on these experiences integrates the perspectives of the clinician, researcher, administrator, and peer reviewer.

Dr. Iwata received his Ph.D. in Psychology from Florida State University and is currently Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Florida, Director of the Florida Center on Self-Injury, and Director of the UF-ARC Prader-Willi Syndrome Program. He previously held faculty appointment at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Western Michigan University. His primary areas of interest are applied behavior analysis, behavioral pediatrics, developmental disabilities, program evaluation, and staff management. He has published over 225 articles and chapters on these topics, and he has received over $6 million in research grants to support that work.

Dr. Iwata is the former Chief Editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Chair of the Human Development Study Section of the National Institutes of Health, President of the following societies: the Association for Behavior Analysis, the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, Division 33 of the American Psychological Association, the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and the Florida Association for Behavior Analysis. He is a Fellow in the American Psychological Association, the Association for Behavior Analysis, the Association for Psychological Science, and the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Social skills training for children with developmental disabilities like Autism

Verbal Behavior Institute social skills trainingFor families coping with children with social skills development disabilities like Autism, Aspergers, ADHD, ADD, ODD, OCD, and other developmental disabilities:

When many of us are hiding are facial expressions, feelings and body language behind technology, it becomes increasingly difficult to navigate these social situations, for children and adolescents with developmental disabilities this task is near impossible.

Research suggests that each social situation varies so much from the next that it is very difficult to effectively teach these skills and have them generalize to different environments and with different people.

During a time when technology is becoming an essential part of our everyday life, our children are losing basic social skills like eye contact, telephone skills, conversation, and empathy for others. Today it is not unusual for an adult to be told through email that they are fired or for young people to end a relationship through a text.

That is why the therapists at Verbal Behavior Institute are choosing to go back to basics. We are designing social groups based on life skills. At school, our children are learning to read, write and complete math problems. At home, they need to learn life skills and daily living skills that will lead to increased independence and social opportunities in their future.

Increased independence provides an increase of social opportunities. Take folding the laundry or setting the table for dinner. Many of us will talk on the phone or chat with our children or even text a friend while demonstrating these skills. However, you have to first know how to talk on the phone, text, fold laundry, or set the table.

At VBI your children and adolescents will learn life skills that are concrete and can be broken down in small steps. Data can be collected and progress can be monitored through this process. These skills will then serve as the foundation for social skills development. Children will develop eye contact, turn taking, and conversation skills while completing simple chores or tasks in the community.

Once the tasks are mastered, students will interact with typical peers to serve as a generalization probe.

All children/adolescents will be evaluated in the following areas: basic living skills, community and home skills using the Assessment of Functional Living Skills by Dr. Jim Partington and Michael Mueller. Once the assessment is complete, the therapist will sit with the parents and develop an individualized social plan (ISP) for your child. A weekly progress report will be sent home with your child to show progress within each program. Life skills will be taught in their natural environment to promote generalization (home/community settings).

Some activities will take place in a home (VBI location) or in the community. Groups will be developed based on age, assessment results and language ability. Groups will consist of 2-6 members to ensure individualized teaching.

Complete the form on this page to get more information on our Spring Social Skills Training Program.

Please leave us a comment below; your feedback is appreciated.

Sincerely,

Vivian Attanasio, Clinical Director, BCBA
Vivian Attanasio
Clinical Director, BCBA